Holy Trinity Episcopal Church~E. Smith Window

ST. MATTHEW 1:18-23
Now the birth of Jesus Christ was on this wise: When as his mother Mary was expoused to Joseph, before they came together, she was found with child of the Holy Ghost. Then Joseph her husband, being a just man, and not willing to make her a publick example, was minded to put her away privily. But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name JESUS: for he shall save his people from their sins. Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.

Eugene Keteltas Smith Jr. B: 9-11-1877 D: 4-2-1905 and Sister
Alice Gardner Smith B: 11-9-1878 D: 6-17-1880
Parents: Father: Eugene K. Smith B: 1-26-1850
Mother: Edna Mary Smith B: 1854 D: 1943
E. K. Smith as he was called was born in Highgate and lived there until his family moved to Swanton and attended the public schools. He had three younger sisters and a brother. His younger sister, Alice Gardner Smith died in infancy.
E. K. Smith was very interested in boats and worked building boats with his father. His father having been born in New York City had many connections with New York aristocrats. E. K. Smith's yacht the WaWa, burned in Plattsburg Bay. It was 50 feet ling and was built for a nephew of Andrew Carnegie at a cost of $12,000.
E. K. Smith died at the home of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Eugene K. Smith, on Canada Street, Swanton, VT of typhoid fever after being ill with fever for about a month.

Eugene Keteltas Smith Jr., his parents and other members of his family are buried at Riverside Cemetery in Swanton, Vermont.


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